For the record: Building permits and bankruptcies | Work & Money

Please purchase a subscription to read our premium content. If you have a subscription, please log in or sign up for an account on our website to continue. If you are a subscriber: Simply log in for unlimited access. If you are a nonsubscriber: You have used your free views allowed every 30 days. You must really value what we do for you. Try a digital subscription for only $0.99. Subscribe now. If you are a nonsubscriber: You have used your free views allowed every 30 days. You must really value what we do for you. Try a digital subscription for only $0.99. Subscribe now. (Listed by owner, tenant or building. This weekly update lists new commercial construction, expansions and enlargements of more than $50,000. Information from initial applications is subject to change. Dollar amount for alterations is valuation provided by applicant.) For those who care about business and this community, we have a deal for you. Start a digital subscription for only $0.99. Sign up now at tulsaworld.com/subscribe. (Filings classified as “business” in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma, and which also list “business” as nature of debt on bankruptcy document.) 19-12073...

Agronomists Detail the Benefits of Updating Agricultural Drainage Infrastructure in New Study

Massive networks of drains, pipes and tiles that enable food production on much of the world’s most productive cropland are due for expansion and replacement to meet the demands of agricultural intensification and climate change. How that infrastructure is updated will have enormous consequences on food production and the environment, according to a new study.The study outlines the need for an overhaul of agricultural drainage infrastructure. Such an update would require major investment and widespread consensus from policymakers, taxpayers and producers, says Michael Castellano, a professor of agronomy at Iowa State University and lead author. But the effort would be a sound long-term plan with a range of benefits, Castellano said. ISU agronomists collaborated with scientists at the University of Kentucky and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH-Zurich on the study, which appeared Monday in the academic journal Nature Sustainability. The researchers based their findings on field experiments and computer simulations.“We have this enormous infrastructure investment that’s deteriorating and needs to be updated,” Castellano says. “If we update it the right way, we can bene...