Bugatti 3D Prints Classic Car for Kids > ENGINEERING.com

YPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN” “http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd”> French sports car manufacturer Bugatti first made its mark on the world with the Bugatti Type 35 race car (“the Bugatti Baby”) in the early 20th century. While the Bugatti family may have passed on and its name may now belong to the Volkswagen Group, the Bugatti Type 35 has been reborn as the Bugatti Baby II. At €30,000 a pop, the Bugatti Baby II is a limited-run electric vehicle for kids of an advantaged socioeconomic status. When actually manufactured, the vehicle will be three-quarters of the size of the original Bugatti Baby and will include a 3D-printed frame. Other features include a rear-wheel-drive powertrain that runs off of removable lithium-ion batteries. The vehicle will top out at 12 mph in “child mode” and 28 mph in “adult mode.” An optional “Speed Key” will allow users to disengage the speed limiter and access all 10kW of the vehicle’s battery. Though the kid car pays tribute to Bugatti’s legacy, the 3D-printed frame recalls more recent developments within the business. Bugatti has already been working with metal 3D printi...

The Little Things I Didn’t Know About Small DC Motors

We’ve all taken apart a small toy and pulled out one of those little can motors. “With this! I can do anything!” we proclaim as we hold it aloft. Ten minutes later, after we’ve made it spin a few times, it goes into the drawer never to be seen again. It always seems like they are in everything but getting them to function usefully in a project is a fool’s errand. What the heck are they for? Where do people learn the black magic needed to make them function? It’s easy enough to pull out the specification sheet for them. Most of them are made by or are made to imitate motors from the Mabuchi Motor Corporation of Japan. That company alone is responsible for over 1.5 billion tiny motors a year. In the specs, you’ll find things like running speed, voltage, stall current, and stall torque. But they offer anything but a convincing application guide, or a basic set of assumptions an engineer should make before using one. This is by no means a complete list, and a skip over the electrics nearly completely as that aspect of DC motors in unreasonably well documented. The first thing to note is that they really aren’t meant to drive anything directly. They are meant to be isolated from the ...